"This is a book you'll remember for years. That's not a stretch or exaggeration.  Tara takes the serious, the complex, and, sometimes, the unimaginable and writes about it in the most approachable of ways. You'll cry and laugh throughout.  Most importantly, your brain will keep firing right till the end, because Tara packs a lot of punch in a short amount of time.  A must read. And, if anyone in Hollywood gets a hold of this lady's life story, a blockbuster movie. Of this, I am sure." - Miranda Writes

“This is a book you’ll remember for years. That’s not a stretch or exaggeration. Tara takes the serious, the complex, and, sometimes, the unimaginable and writes about it in the most approachable of ways. You’ll cry and laugh throughout. Most importantly, your brain will keep firing right till the end, because Tara packs a lot of punch in a short amount of time. A must read. And, if anyone in Hollywood gets a hold of this lady’s life story, a blockbuster movie. Of this, I am sure.” – Miranda Writes

"Another example of Tara's wonderful writing which is insightful, compassionate and ultimately so very very human. She is a skilled writer with profound insights and well worth a read. This is worth far more than the few bucks your likely to pay." - Jason

“Another example of Tara’s wonderful writing which is insightful, compassionate and ultimately so very very human. She is a skilled writer with profound insights and well worth a read. This is worth far more than the few bucks your likely to pay.” – Jason

"Fans of Tara Burns' first two books will find much to love here. Burns tells sex work stories with a sort of "sure I live on the margins of society and it makes me lotsa money and I love it, haters" edge to it, a rebellious glee, that I never fail to identify with. It reminds me of the feeling I had when I first started working, a feeling that's never entirely gone away, of sticking my tongue out at the whole world while simultaneously gathering up lots of free money. One of the stories is even entitled: "In Which The Universe Licks My Face Like An Excited Puppy and Then ****** Money All Over Me." But there's a somber emotional core to this book that the other two lacked. In the third story, "Studying Evil," Burns writes a sequel of sorts to her Vice magazine article earlier this summer, "How I Survived Being Rescued From Sex Trafficking/Sex Trafficking: How I Survived Foster Care," in which she detailed how she made do for herself as a teenager in the foster care system, turning tricks to stay alive when her case worker would kick her out of the youth shelter she fled to from abusive foster home situations because of her self harm (or other bulls*** reasons to send a 15 year old out in to the Alaskan winter.) In the piece, Burns confronts the case worker many years later. She captures the nuances of trauma survivor thought patterns perfectly here, noting that she wants to believe the case worker's memory of the incidents in which she didn't do all of those awful things to Burns, and wonders if it is her memory that is wrong. She also contrasts the way she was treated in her youth with the case worker's privileged young son, hovering in the background and incapable of filling out his college applications by himself without his mother's guidance. This is the most powerful piece of writing I've ever read by Burns, bar none, including all her books and articles. In the last piece in the book, "Whore to Culture," Burns returns to unsettling themes like power imbalance, police abuse, whorephobia, classism, misogyny, and violence and handles them deftly in discussing her experience at her grad school social work program, and her feelings at confronting an instructor's unexamined privilege: "I'm a social worker--cops listen to me." Don't get me wrong, the book is no downer. Tara's wit, usually aimed hilariously at the expense of her clients, is light hearted and fun, and many of her one liners had me fulfilling that internet trope and Laughing Out Loud. The book isn't perfect--I question the choice to include a lengthy client e-mail in one of the pieces (though it was ludicrous and should be included in the johnssaythedarnedestthings tumblr.) Also, maybe I'm a 90s music pedant, but that Nine Inch Nails song is called "Closer," not "**** You Like An Animal." But these concerns are minor quibbles--overall, the book is a great read and exemplifies Burns' dramatic progress as a writer." - marginalutility

“Fans of Tara Burns’ first two books will find much to love here. Burns tells sex work stories with a sort of “sure I live on the margins of society and it makes me lotsa money and I love it, haters” edge to it, a rebellious glee, that I never fail to identify with. It reminds me of the feeling I had when I first started working, a feeling that’s never entirely gone away, of sticking my tongue out at the whole world while simultaneously gathering up lots of free money. One of the stories is even entitled: “In Which The Universe Licks My Face Like An Excited Puppy and Then ****** Money All Over Me.”
But there’s a somber emotional core to this book that the other two lacked. In the third story, “Studying Evil,” Burns writes a sequel of sorts to her Vice magazine article earlier this summer, “How I Survived Being Rescued From Sex Trafficking/Sex Trafficking: How I Survived Foster Care,” in which she detailed how she made do for herself as a teenager in the foster care system, turning tricks to stay alive when her case worker would kick her out of the youth shelter she fled to from abusive foster home situations because of her self harm (or other bulls*** reasons to send a 15 year old out in to the Alaskan winter.) In the piece, Burns confronts the case worker many years later. She captures the nuances of trauma survivor thought patterns perfectly here, noting that she wants to believe the case worker’s memory of the incidents in which she didn’t do all of those awful things to Burns, and wonders if it is her memory that is wrong. She also contrasts the way she was treated in her youth with the case worker’s privileged young son, hovering in the background and incapable of filling out his college applications by himself without his mother’s guidance. This is the most powerful piece of writing I’ve ever read by Burns, bar none, including all her books and articles. In the last piece in the book, “Whore to Culture,” Burns returns to unsettling themes like power imbalance, police abuse, whorephobia, classism, misogyny, and violence and handles them deftly in discussing her experience at her grad school social work program, and her feelings at confronting an instructor’s unexamined privilege: “I’m a social worker–cops listen to me.”
Don’t get me wrong, the book is no downer. Tara’s wit, usually aimed hilariously at the expense of her clients, is light hearted and fun, and many of her one liners had me fulfilling that internet trope and Laughing Out Loud. The book isn’t perfect–I question the choice to include a lengthy client e-mail in one of the pieces (though it was ludicrous and should be included in the johnssaythedarnedestthings tumblr.) Also, maybe I’m a 90s music pedant, but that Nine Inch Nails song is called “Closer,” not “**** You Like An Animal.” But these concerns are minor quibbles–overall, the book is a great read and exemplifies Burns’ dramatic progress as a writer.” – marginalutility

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